Seminar Speakers

This page will be updated as planning proceeds.

Professor David Harris

    Seminar Speaker
  • David Harris is Associate Dean and Head of Sydney Medical School (Westmead), The University of Sydney. He is Director of the Renal Failure Laboratory in the Centre for Transplantation and Renal Research, Westmead Millennium Institute. He is a nephrologist at Westmead Hospital.

    He is President-elect of the International Society of Nephrology (ISN), Presidentof the Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology (APSN), and Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network.

    He has published more than 250 papers, and given more than 180 invited national and international presentations. His major clinical and research interests include progressive CKD and dialysis, and his laboratory interests are focussed on pathogenesis of and novel therapies for progressive CKD.

Associate Professor Catherine Stedman

    Seminar Speaker
  • Associate Professor Catherine Stedman is a Gastroenterologist and Hepatologist at Christchurch Hospital, and also Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine for University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand. She undertook medical training through the University of Otago and completed FRACP specialist training in both Gastroenterology/Hepatology and Clinical Pharmacology, followed by PhD studies in Molecular Pharmacology and Hepatology at the Storr Liver Unit, in Sydney Australia.

    She is currently has a strong interest in Hepatitis C new oral drug development. She has been principal investigator for over 50 clinical trials from phase 1 through to phase 3. She has been a significant contributor to several pivotal proof of concept interferon free trials for hepatitis C treatment over the past 5 years.

Professor Suetonia Palmer

    Seminar Speaker
  • Suetonia Palmer is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Otago Christchurch, New Zealand and a nephrologist working with the Canterbury District Health Board. Suetonia received a Don and Lorraine Jacquot Fellowship in 2009 and 2010 to undertake her post-doctoral studies at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA. She was the first New Zealander to win a L’Oreal Australia and New Zealand For Women in Science Fellowship (in 2012) and is currently one of 50 Royal Society of New Zealand Rutherford Discovery Fellows. She is a member of the Australasian Kidney Trials Network scientific committee and the CARI steering committee, is the New Zealand convenor of the ANZDATA indigenous Working Group and has been an editor of the Cochrane Renal Group since 2011.

Associate Professor Tim Hewitson

    Seminar Speaker
  • Tim Hewitson is a Senior Scientist in the Department of Nephrology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital and is a Principal Fellow with the Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne. He is a science graduate, with an ongoing interest in the mechanisms of chronic kidney disease. He has published widely on all aspects of nephrology, and continues to be the Editor of a series of books on laboratory techniques for Springer Protocols. His PhD and much subsequent research has focused on the pathology and cell biology of progressive kidney disease, the objective being to better understand the failure of repair mechanisms after injury.

Professor Annemarie Hennessy

    Seminar Speaker
  • Dean of the School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney 2012 to present. Foundation Chair of Medicine at School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney 2006-2011.
    She is a Renal Physician with a research interest in Hypertension and Hypertension in pregnancy. Annemarie graduated from the University of Queensland in 1985 (MBBS), the University of Sydney in 1997 (PhD) and she has Fellowship of the Royal Australian College of Physicians (FRACP, 1992) and an MBA from the Australian Graduate School of Management (2004). She has held positions in hospital management, clinical service delivery planning and workforce and vocational training, including past Chair Health Education and Training Institute (HETI) NSW State Physician Training Council.  She works with a strong research team across Sydney and South Western Sydney committed to preventing preeclampsia and pregnancy related Renal disease.

    Since 2006 she has been leading the Humoral Immunity and Autoimmunity Group at ANU first supported by a Viertel Senior Medical Research Fellowship and currently by an Elizabeth Blackburn NHMRC fellowship. Her group identified a critical role for follicular helper T (Tfh) cells in autoantibody-mediated autoimmune diseases and made significant discoveries into the function and transcriptional regulation of this cell subset. She has won several prizes including the 2008 Science Minister’s Prize (Life Scientist of the year), the 2009 Gottschalk Medal of the Australian Academy of Sciences and the inaugural CSL-Young Florey Medal.

    She is currently Professor of Immunology at the ANU and Head of the Immunology and Infectious Disease Department. Since its launch in 2014, Carola is joint Director of the Centre for Personalised Immunology (an NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence) that aims to dissect the genetic, molecular and cellular pathogenesis of immune disease in individual patients with the goal of improving diagnoses and identifying targeted therapies. Website

  • Professor Carola G. Vinuesa

      Seminar Speaker
    • Carola Vinuesa was born in Spain and obtained a medical degree at the University Autonoma of Madrid. She undertook specialist clinical training in the UK and in 2000 was awarded a PhD by the University of Birmingham. As the recipient of a Wellcome Trust International Travelling prize Fellowship, she did postdoctoral work at The John Curtin School for Medical Research (The Australian National University, ANU). Her work led to the discovery of genes important for immune regulation and memory and the identification of a novel pathway of posttranscriptional control of gene expression to prevent autoimmunity.

      Since 2006 she has been leading the Humoral Immunity and Autoimmunity Group at ANU first supported by a Viertel Senior Medical Research Fellowship and currently by an Elizabeth Blackburn NHMRC fellowship. Her group identified a critical role for follicular helper T (Tfh) cells in autoantibody-mediated autoimmune diseases and made significant discoveries into the function and transcriptional regulation of this cell subset. She has won several prizes including the 2008 Science Minister’s Prize (Life Scientist of the year), the 2009 Gottschalk Medal of the Australian Academy of Sciences and the inaugural CSL-Young Florey Medal.

      She is currently Professor of Immunology at the ANU and Head of the Immunology and Infectious Disease Department. Since its launch in 2014, Carola is joint Director of the Centre for Personalised Immunology (an NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence) that aims to dissect the genetic, molecular and cellular pathogenesis of immune disease in individual patients with the goal of improving diagnoses and identifying targeted therapies.

      Website

Associate Professor Carol Wicking

    Seminar Speaker
  • Associate Professor Carol Wicking is the director of the newly formed IMB Centre for Rare Disease Research, and research group leader, at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at The University of Queensland. She has over 25 years research experience spanning human genetics, and cell and developmental biology. A/Prof Wicking obtained her PhD from London University, working on identification of the cystic fibrosis gene. Her research over the past 20 years has focused on the role of hedgehog signalling in organogenesis, and more recently on a class of congenital disorders known as ciliopathies. These diseases arise through dysfunction of the primary cilium, and while variable in presentation, a hallmark phenotype of many ciliopathies is polycystic kidney disease.

 

 

Professor Jonathon Gleadle

    Seminar Speaker
  • Jonathan Gleadle is Professor of Medicine at Flinders University and a full time Consultant Nephrologist at Flinders Medical Centre. He undertook undergraduate medical studies at Merton College, Oxford and the University of Oxford Medical School and general medical and nephrology training in Oxford, Cambridge and London. He was awarded an MRC Training Fellowship to undertake research at the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford from 1993-1997 leading to a DPhil entitled "The mechanism of oxygen sensing by mammalian cells". He was University Lecturer and Honorary Consultant in Nephrology and General Medicine, University of Oxford (2001-2007) and continues to pursue activities in clinical medicine, teaching and research. He has contributed to over 50 highly cited publications in the fields of oxygen sensing, microRNAs and clinical nephrology (over 6000 citations) and generated several medical student and physician textbooks. Recently research has focussed on the clinical relevance of microRNAs and exosomes in renal disease and renal cancer and on molecular and cellular responses to oxygen. This work was initially funded by the Jacquot Research Establishment Award in 2008 and 2009. Recent clinical studies have also examined the clinical relevance of microRNAs to renal disease and viruses, the role of cardiac MRI in renal patients and the use of novel surfaces to facilitate novel urine diagnostics and anti-infective strategies.

 

 

 

Professor Philip Poronnik

    Seminar Speaker
  • Philip Poronnik is Professor of Biomedical Science at the Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney. He graduated from Sydney University with a PhD in electrophysiology after which he worked as an ARC Research Fellow in Physiology and then in the renal research laboratory at Royal North Shore Hospital with Carol Pollock. In 2003 he moved to the School of Biomedical Science at The University of Queensland where he was professor of physiology. In 2009 he moved to RMIT as head of the Pharmaceutical Sciences program and then returned to Sydney in 2013. He was awarded the UQ Research Foundation Excellence award in 2005, the Roberts award of the Australian Physiological Society for excellence in teaching.

    He has an ongoing interest in the molecular physiology of membrane transport and the changes that occur in disease, including diabetic nephropathy. One major are is the mechanism of renal handling of albumin where he has published a number of papers describing the molecular complex involved. His recent work has focused on the regulation of membrane function by ubiquitin ligases, in particular Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 and he is now using a proteomic approach to map the renal ubiquitome in the normal and diseased kidney.

 

Associate Professor Rachael Morton

    Seminar Speaker
  • Rachael Morton is a health economist at the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney.  Her research includes within-trial and modeled economic evaluations of public health interventions applied to chronic kidney disease and melanoma. Her PhD in health economics, focused on patient and carer preferences for the treatment of chronic kidney disease, using discrete choice analysis methods. A/Prof Morton is the current recipient of an NHMRC Sidney Sax post-doctoral fellowship, and has recently returned to Australia following two years at the Health Economics Research Centre, University of Oxford, where she analysed data from large trials including the Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP).

    A/Prof Morton teaches health economics to postgraduate students at Sydney and Oxford Universities and is a member of the KDIGO Supportive Care working group and the Kidney Health Australia Home Dialysis Advisory Committee. She has methodological research interests in preference elicitation, health equity and the economic evaluation of renal supportive care.